Tact is for wienies

Lighten up

216,680 notes

mereechoesofwhatoncewas:

mspunkopera:

a-weeping-angel-just:

the-would-be-king:

tibiae:


This is a rare meteorological phenomenon called a skypunch. When people see these, they think it’s the end of the world. Ice crystals form above the high-altitude cirro-cumulo-stratus clouds, then fall downward, punching a hole in the cloud cover. 

It’s beautiful

HEIMDALL!! I KNOW YOU CAN HEAR ME!!
OPEN THE BIFROST!!

WHEN FANDOMS ATTACK
NO HIPSTER IS SAFE

mereechoesofwhatoncewas:

mspunkopera:

a-weeping-angel-just:

the-would-be-king:

tibiae:

This is a rare meteorological phenomenon called a skypunch. When people see these, they think it’s the end of the world. Ice crystals form above the high-altitude cirro-cumulo-stratus clouds, then fall downward, punching a hole in the cloud cover. 

It’s beautiful

HEIMDALL!! I KNOW YOU CAN HEAR ME!!

OPEN THE BIFROST!!

WHEN FANDOMS ATTACK

NO HIPSTER IS SAFE

image

(Source: exoticana, via zog-the-angry-chipmunk)

43 notes

kcowyo:

Smith Mansion - Lee Smith spent two decades single-handily building this log cabin monstrosity about 15 miles east of Yellowstone. He died in 1992 before it was completed and it sat abandoned for 20 years. His daughter recently launched a preservation organization to restore the mansion and offer guided tours. *More info can be found here -

kcowyo:

Smith Mansion - Lee Smith spent two decades single-handily building this log cabin monstrosity about 15 miles east of Yellowstone. He died in 1992 before it was completed and it sat abandoned for 20 years. His daughter recently launched a preservation organization to restore the mansion and offer guided tours. *More info can be found here -

(via log-cabins)

1 note

This smiling Frosty is no ordinary snowman—he’s made entirely of mold.
The living artwork is the creation of Stephanie Mounaud, an infectious disease researcher at the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) in Rockville, Maryland.
For the last several Christmases, Mounaud has used the different strains of mold that she works with to create holiday-themed fungal art.
The snowman pictured here was made by combining four different fungi, including common strains such as Aspergillus niger and rarer ones such asPenicillium marneffei.
Getting the colors just right for her artwork was tricky and required growing the right fungi on the right medium. For example, “the color that you see in the snowman is made from the spores,” hardy reproductive forms of fungi used for dispersal, Mounaud explained.
To coax the fungi to create spores, Mounaud used a nutrient-poor growth medium. “When you give them a starved condition, the fungi really want to produce their spores because they feel they’re in an environment where they need to survive,” she said.

This smiling Frosty is no ordinary snowman—he’s made entirely of mold.

The living artwork is the creation of Stephanie Mounaud, an infectious disease researcher at the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) in Rockville, Maryland.

For the last several Christmases, Mounaud has used the different strains of mold that she works with to create holiday-themed fungal art.

The snowman pictured here was made by combining four different fungi, including common strains such as Aspergillus niger and rarer ones such asPenicillium marneffei.

Getting the colors just right for her artwork was tricky and required growing the right fungi on the right medium. For example, “the color that you see in the snowman is made from the spores,” hardy reproductive forms of fungi used for dispersal, Mounaud explained.

To coax the fungi to create spores, Mounaud used a nutrient-poor growth medium. “When you give them a starved condition, the fungi really want to produce their spores because they feel they’re in an environment where they need to survive,” she said.

Filed under fungus snowman science